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A Bend in the River’s Future

Category: Assessing Agriculture and Ecosystems
Project Team: Georgia Ecological Forecasting
Team Location: University of Georgia – Athens, Georgia

Communities in the Bayou: Mapping Invasive Species and Human Impacts

Category: Monitoring Wetlands and Mitigating Floods
VPS Project Title: Communities in the Bayou: Mapping Invasive Species and Human Impacts
Project Team: Mississippi Water Resources II

Team Location: Mobile County Health Department (MCHD) – Mobile, Alabama

Where There’s Wine, There’s a Way

Category: Assessing Agriculture and Ecosystems
Project Team: Virginia Agriculture II
Team Location: Wise County Clerk of Court’s Office – Wise, Virginia

Taking Droughts From Earth to Space

Category: Assessing Agriculture and Ecosystems
Project Team: Uruguay Agriculture II
Team Location: International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) – Palisades, New York

Reconstructing Forest Harvest History Using Landsat Imagery

Category: Assessing Agriculture and Ecosystems
Project Team: Colorado Agriculture
Team Location: Fort Collins, Colorado

So Many Maps, So Little Time

Category: Monitoring Wetlands and Mitigating Floods
Project Team: Malawi Disasters Team
Team Location: International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) – Palisades, New York

Enhanced Landslide Detection and Hazard Modeling for the Koshi River Basin

Category: Responding to Natural Disasters and Environmental Changes
Project Team: Himalayan Disasters
Team Location: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center – Greenbelt, Maryland

Drought Monitoring in the Coastal Mid-Atlantic Region

Category: Responding to Natural Disasters and Environmental Changes
Project Team: Coastal Mid-Atlantic Water Resources III
Team Location: NASA Langley Research Center – Hampton, Virginia

Wiring the world below

Originally Published by The Economist

THE planet arrogantly dubbed “Earth” by its dominant terrestrial species might more accurately be called “Sea”. Seven-tenths of its surface is ocean, yet humanity’s need to breathe air and its inability to resist pressure means this part of the orb is barely understood.

Werewolf plant waits for the light of the full moon

Originally Published by New Scientist

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